Alkaline Foods Prevent Muscle and Bone Loss

USDA Study Shows Alkaline Foods Prevent Muscle and Bone Loss

Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, alkaline minerals, fiber that are key to good health. Now, a newly released study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS: ARS is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s chief scientific research agency) -funded scientists suggests alkaline plant foods also may help preserve muscle mass and bone density in older men and women.

The study was led by physician and nutrition specialist Bess Dawson-Hughes at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston, Mass.

The typical American diet is rich highly acidic in protein, cereal grains and other acid-producing foods. In general, such acidic diets generate dietary amounts of acid each day. With aging, a mild but slowly increasing metabolic “acidosis” develops, according to the researchers.

Acidosis appears to trigger a muscle-wasting response. So the researchers looked at links between measures of lean body mass and diets relatively high in alkaline potassium-rich, alkaline-residue producing fruits and vegetables. Such diets could help neutralize acidosis. Foods can be considered alkaline or acidic based on the residues they produce in the body, rather than whether they are alkaline or acidic themselves. For example, acidic grapefruits, lemons and limes are metabolized to alkaline residues because of their high alkaline potassium bicarbonate content. Continue reading

An Interesting Article from Nature Conservancy

You’re standing at the kitchen sink cleaning the dinner dishes when eco-confusion strikes: what’s the greenest way to dispose of your meat scraps and other non-compostable leftovers—in the trash or garbage disposal (if you have one)?

Grinding up leftover chicken bones in the garbage disposal means sending them down the drain to be handled by your wastewater treatment facility, which requires plenty of water and energy. But dropping them in the trash means decades of slow decomposition in a landfill.

Read the answer from one of the Conservancy’s green living experts below, and don’t forget to send us your questions on any conservation subject for one of the Conservancy’s 550 staff scientists. (Note: We regret that we can only answer one or two questions each month and that we cannot answer the others offline.)

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